Safe and Toxic Plants for Dogs: Know What to Avoid in Australia

Disclaimer: Affiliate links are used within Pawtal. All 3rd party companies added are well researched to provide honest, unbiased opinions. Pawtal does receive a small commission that assists with our service, so please factor that into your purchase decision.

Share to spread the love of pets and travel!

contents

Ensuring the safety of our furry friends is crucial, especially when it comes to what they can come into contact with at home.

As a pet owner, I understand the challenges in distinguishing between safe and toxic plants for dogs. Many common household plants can be harmful, and it’s vital to recognise which ones pose a risk to your pet’s health.

In this guide, I’ll walk you through a list of safe and toxic plants, helping you create a safer environment for your pets. For more detailed information on food or plants that could be dangerous, please visit Food and Plants Toxic to Dogs. By educating ourselves, we can prevent unfortunate incidents and ensure our pets stay healthy and happy.

Let’s understand which plants (including indoor) are safe and which to keep away from our canine companions.

Transform ordinary note-taking into a journey of love, joy, and inspiration with a new pet affirmation at every turn.
Perfect for pet lovers of all ages!

Safe and Toxic Plants for Dogs While Travelling

As pet owners, we all want to ensure the safety and well-being of our furry friends, especially when travelling.

One of the most important things to consider when travelling with dogs is the type of plants that they may come across, as some plants can be toxic and cause serious health problems.

The Potential Harm of Toxic Plants on Dogs

Toxic plants can cause a range of health issues in dogs, from mild symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhoea to more severe cases such as liver failure or even death.

It is essential to be aware of the types of plants that can be harmful to dogs and to take the necessary precautions to avoid them.

Impact on Your Travel Plans

Encountering toxic plants during your travels can not only harm your pet, but it can also impact your travel plans. If your dog accidentally ingests a toxic plant, you may need to seek immediate veterinary care, which can be costly and time-consuming.

If your dog becomes ill due to a toxic plant, it may limit your ability to participate in planned activities, or even cut your trip short altogether. It is crucial to research and know which plants to avoid when travelling with your furry companion in Australia.

In the following sections, we will provide you with a comprehensive list of safe and toxic plants for dogs to help keep your pet safe during your travels.

Indoor and Outdoor Plants Toxic to Dogs in Australia

As a dog owner, it’s essential to be aware of the plants in and around your home that can be toxic to your furry friend. Want to know which indoor plants are safe for dogs? Take a look at my post here.

Here is a list of common indoor and outdoor plants toxic to dogs in Australia;

Safe and Toxic Plants for Dogs
Wandering Jew (Tradescantia pallida)

Wandering Jew (Tradescantia pallida)

  • toxic parts: The leaves and stems
  • symptoms: Omitting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and loss of appetite. The severity of symptoms depends on the amount of plant material ingested and the size of the dog
  • severity: Can lead to dehydration and even kidney damage
  • commonly found: In Queensland as well as in other parts of the country, including New South Wales, Western Australia, and the Northern Territory

Wandering Jew (Tradescantia pallida) is not native to Australia, but it has been introduced and naturalised in many parts of the country, particularly in warmer and more humid areas. 

Wandering Jew is often found in gardens, parks, and other landscaped areas, as well as along roadsides and in disturbed or degraded habitats. Due to its ability to spread rapidly and outcompete native vegetation, it is considered a pest plant in some regions of Australia.

Safe and Toxic Plants for Dogs
Aloe Vera (Aloe barbadensis)

Aloe Vera (Aloe barbadensis)

  • toxic parts: The gel inside the leaves
  • symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, and a change in urine color
  • severity: Mild
  • commonly found: In Queensland, New South Wales, and Western Australia

Aloe Vera (Aloe barbadensis) is not native to Australia, but it is widely cultivated and commonly found in gardens, homes, and natural health product stores throughout the country. It is a popular ornamental plant due to its distinctive appearance, low maintenance requirements, and potential medicinal properties.

It is often grown in pots or as a garden plant, and it is also used in various cosmetic and medicinal products. It is important to note that some parts of the plant can be toxic to pets, so it should be kept out of reach of dogs and cats.

Safe and Toxic Plants for Dogs
Sago Palm (Cycas revoluta)

Sago Palm (Cycas revoluta)

  • toxic parts: The seeds and leaves
  • symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, seizures, liver failure, and even death
  • severity: Severe
  • commonly found: In gardens, parks, and other landscaped areas throughout Australia, particularly in warmer regions such as Queensland and northern New South Wales

Sago Palm (Cycas revoluta) is not native to Australia, but it is commonly grown as an ornamental plant in many parts of the country. It is a popular landscaping plant due to its distinctive appearance, low maintenance requirements, and tolerance to drought and heat.

It is important to note that all parts of the Sago Palm, especially the seeds, contain toxic chemicals that can be harmful or fatal if ingested by humans or animals.

Safe and Toxic Plants for Dogs
Azalea (Rhododendron spp.)

Azalea (Rhododendron spp.)

  • toxic parts: All parts, including the leaves, flowers, and nectar
  • symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, weakness, depression, and in severe cases, coma, and death
  • severity: Severe
  • commonly found: In cooler regions with acidic soils, such as in the southeastern states of Victoria, New South Wales, and Tasmania

Azaleas (Rhododendron spp.) is a popular ornamental plant, valued for their attractive flowers and foliage, and are often used in gardens, parks, and public landscaping.

Azaleas can be grown as shrubs or small trees, and there are many different cultivars available with a range of flower colors and sizes. Some species of Rhododendron, including some types of Azalea, contain toxic compounds that can be harmful or fatal if ingested by humans or animals.

Safe and Toxic Plants for Dogs
Tulip (Tulipa spp.)

Tulip (Tulipa spp.)

  • toxic parts: The bulb
  • symptoms: Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, drooling, increased heart rate, respiratory distress, and in severe cases, convulsions, and cardiac problems
  • severity: Moderate to Severe
  • commonly found: In gardens, parks, and public landscaping in cooler regions. This includes the southern states of Victoria, Tasmania, and parts of New South Wales and South Australia

Tulips (Tulipa spp.) are usually planted in autumn for spring flowering, and there are many different cultivars available with a wide range of colors, shapes, and sizes.

All parts of the Tulip plant, particularly the bulb, contain toxic compounds that can be harmful if ingested by humans or animals. Ingesting even a small amount can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and other digestive problems.

Safe and Toxic Plants for Dogs
Lily (Lilium spp.)

Lily (Lilium spp.)

  • toxic parts: All parts, including the leaves, flowers, pollen, and stems
  • symptoms: Vomiting, loss of appetite, lethargy, dehydration, and in severe cases, kidney failure
  • severity: Severe
  • commonly found: In gardens, parks, and public landscaping throughout the country

Lilies (Lilium spp.) are popular ornamental plants that are widely cultivated in Australia. Lilies are usually planted in autumn or winter for spring or summer flowering, and there are many different cultivars available with a wide range of colors, shapes, and sizes.

It is important to note that some species of Lily, including Easter Lily (Lilium longiflorum) and Tiger Lily (Lilium lancifolium), contain toxic compounds that can be harmful or fatal if ingested by cats.

Safe and Toxic Plants for Dogs
Daffodil (Narcissus spp.)

Daffodil (Narcissus spp.)

  • Toxic parts: The bulb
  • Symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and in severe cases, respiratory and cardiac problems
  • Severity: Moderate to Severe
  • Commonly found: In cooler regions such as in the southern states of Victoria, Tasmania, and parts of New South Wales and South Australia

Daffodils (Narcissus spp.) are popular ornamental plants that are widely cultivated in Australia.  Daffodils are usually planted in autumn for spring flowering, and there are many different cultivars available with a wide range of colors, shapes, and sizes.

All parts of the Daffodil plant, particularly the bulb, contain toxic compounds that can be harmful if ingested by humans or animals.

Safe and Toxic Plants for Dogs
Oleander (Nerium oleander)

Oleander (Nerium oleander)

  • toxic parts: The entire plant, especially the leaves, and flowers
  • symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, difficulty breathing, abnormal heart rate, seizures, and even death in severe cases
  • severity: Severe
  • commonly found: In the northern and eastern coastal areas of New South Wales and Queensland

Oleander (Nerium oleander) is a popular ornamental plant that is widely cultivated in Australia, particularly in warmer regions with a Mediterranean or subtropical climate. It is commonly found in gardens, parks, and public landscaping, and is valued for its attractive flowers, evergreen foliage, and drought tolerance.

However, it is important to note that all parts of the Oleander plant, particularly the leaves, contain toxic compounds that can be harmful or fatal if ingested by humans or animals.

Safe and Toxic Plants for Dogs
Philodendron (Philodendron spp.)

Philodendron (Philodendron spp.)

  • toxic parts: All parts, including the leaves and stems
  • symptoms: Oral irritation, drooling, vomiting, and in severe cases, difficulty swallowing and breathing
  • severity: Mild to Moderate
  • Commonly found: In northern parts of Queensland and Western Australia

Philodendrons are typically grown as houseplants or in sheltered outdoor locations in warmer regions with tropical or subtropical climates. There are many different species and cultivars of Philodendron available, with a wide range of leaf shapes, sizes, and colors.

Philodendrons contain calcium oxalate crystals, which can cause irritation and swelling if ingested or touched by humans or animals.

Safe and Toxic Plants for Dogs
Poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima)

Poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima)

  • toxic parts: The milky sap or latex
  • symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, drooling, skin irritation, and eye irritation
  • severity: Mild to moderate
  • commonly found: In northern parts of Queensland and Western Australia.

Poinsettias (Euphorbia pulcherrima) are popular ornamental plants that are widely cultivated in Australia as a seasonal decoration for the Christmas holidays. They are commonly found in garden centers, nurseries, and supermarkets throughout the country in the weeks leading up to Christmas. 

Poinsettias belong to the Euphorbia family, which contains a milky sap that can be irritating to the skin and toxic if ingested by humans or animals.

Safe and Toxic Plants for Dogs
English Ivy (Hedera helix)

English Ivy (Hedera helix)

  • toxic parts: The entire plant
  • symptoms: Vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, drooling, breathing difficulties, coma, and even death in severe cases
  • severity: Moderate to severe
  • commonly found: In southern Australia and parts of Victoria, Tasmania, and New South Wales

English Ivy is commonly found in gardens, parks, and public landscaping throughout the country. It is valued for its attractive foliage and ability to grow in a wide range of conditions as a ground cover or as a climbing vine on walls, fences, and other structures.

It is highly invasive which can damage native ecosystems and infrastructure, and can also cause skin irritation and allergic reactions in some people.

Learn about nutrition, grooming, disease prevention, and more. Ensure your dog’s happiness and health with expert tips.

Purchase now for a better bond with your furry friend! Join the Pawtal family and master pet ownership for just $4.95!

Want a preview before purchase? Download the 1st chapter, decoding dog food labels yours FREE!

Symptoms of Plant Poisoning in Dogs

Plant poisoning in dogs can result in a variety of symptoms, ranging from mild to severe. The severity and type of symptoms depend on the type of plant and the amount ingested.

Common symptoms of plant poisoning in dogs may include vomiting, diarrhoea, abdominal pain, drooling, loss of appetite, lethargy, weakness, seizures, respiratory distress, and even organ failure.

It’s important to note that some symptoms may not appear immediately after ingestion and can take several hours or even days to develop. Additionally, some plants may not cause symptoms right away but can lead to chronic health issues over time.

Early detection of symptoms and prompt veterinary care are crucial in treating plant poisoning in dogs. If you suspect your dog has ingested a toxic plant, it’s important to seek veterinary care immediately.

Delaying treatment can result in more severe symptoms, increased treatment costs, and longer recovery times.

Know the symptoms

Knowing the common symptoms of plant poisoning in dogs and being vigilant about your dog’s behaviour while travelling.

This can help you detect and address any potential issues quickly, allowing you to continue enjoying your travels with peace of mind.

How to Prevent Plant Poisoning in Dogs while Travelling

Prevention is key when it comes to protecting your dog from plant poisoning while traveling. Here are some tips to help keep your dog safe;

  1. educate yourself: Know which plants are toxic to dogs and which ones are safe. Avoid planting toxic plants in your yard and keep your dog away from them when on walks or outdoor excursions.

  2. supervise your dog: When outdoors, keep a close eye on your dog and prevent them from eating or sniffing plants that you are unfamiliar with. Dogs are naturally curious and may eat something that is harmful to them.

  3. keep plants out of reach: If you have indoor plants, make sure they are out of reach of your dog. Consider using hanging baskets or placing plants on high shelves to prevent your dog from accessing them.

  4. use safe alternatives: If you want to add some greenery to your home or yard, consider using safe plants that are non-toxic to dogs.

  5. properly dispose of plant material: After gardening or trimming plants, make sure to properly dispose of the plant material. Dogs may be attracted to the smell and try to eat the clippings or debris.

By following these tips, you can help prevent plant poisoning in your dog while traveling. If you suspect your dog has ingested a toxic plant, seek veterinary care immediately. Remember, early detection and prompt treatment can make all the difference in your dog’s recovery.

Need further advice? Check out how to stop dogs from eating plants!

Subscribe to our mailing list and stay updated with pet-friendly locations, travel tips, and much more!

Receive our FREE Pet Travel Australia guide filled with tips and advice on how to plan your next pet adventure! 

Safe Plants that are non-toxic to dogs

Some safe plants that you can add to your home or yard without worrying about the potential harm to your dog are;

indoor plants which are safe for dogs
Spider Plant (Chlorophytum comosum)

Spider Plant (Chlorophytum comosum)

Spider plants are a popular indoor plant that is safe for dogs. They are easy to care for and have long, green, and white-striped leaves that add a touch of beauty to any room.

Not only are they safe for dogs, but they also help purify the air by removing toxins such as formaldehyde and benzene.

indoor plants which are safe for dogs
Boston Fern (Nephrolepis exaltata)

Boston Fern (Nephrolepis exaltata)

Boston ferns are another popular indoor plant that is safe for dogs. They have lush, green fronds that give them a tropical look, and they are excellent at purifying the air.

They thrive in humid environments and make great additions to bathrooms or other areas with high moisture levels.

indoor plants which are safe for dogs
Bamboo Palm (Chamaedorea seifrizii)

Bamboo Palm (Chamaedorea seifrizii)

Bamboo palms are a safe indoor plant for dogs that adds a touch of elegance to any room. They have long, thin leaves that fan out from a central stalk, giving them a unique appearance.

Bamboo palms are excellent at purifying the air and are low maintenance, making them an ideal plant for busy pet owners.

indoor plants which are safe for dogs
African Violet (Saintpaulia spp.)

African Violet (Saintpaulia spp.)

African violets are a small, delicate indoor plant with beautiful, colorful blooms. They are safe for dogs and make great additions to windowsills or other areas with bright, indirect light.

African violets require little maintenance, making them ideal for pet owners with busy schedules.

indoor plants which are safe for dogs
Christmas Cactus (Schlumbergera spp.)

Christmas Cactus (Schlumbergera spp.)

Christmas cacti are a festive indoor plant that is safe for dogs. They produce colorful blooms during the holiday season and are low maintenance, making them an ideal plant for pet owners.

Christmas cacti require bright, indirect light and minimal watering.

indoor plants which are safe for dogs
Friendship Plant (Pilea involucrata)

Friendship Plant (Pilea involucrata)

Friendship plants are a unique indoor plant with leaves that resemble tiny pancakes. They are safe for dogs and make great additions to desks or other areas where you need a touch of green.

Friendship plants require minimal maintenance and are excellent at purifying the air.

indoor plants which are safe for dogs
Ponytail Palm (Beaucarnea recurvata)

Ponytail Palm (Beaucarnea recurvata)

Ponytail palms are a unique indoor plant that is safe for dogs. They have long, thin leaves that grow from a bulbous base, giving them the appearance of a miniature palm tree.

Ponytail palms are low maintenance and require minimal watering, making them ideal for busy pet owners.

indoor plants which are safe for dogs
Money Plant (Epipremnum aureum)

Money Plant (Epipremnum aureum)

Money plants, also known as devil’s ivy, are a popular indoor plant that is safe for dogs. They have large, glossy leaves that can grow up to 30 feet long, making them ideal for hanging baskets or training up trellises.

Money plants require minimal maintenance and are excellent at purifying the air.

indoor plants which are safe for dogs
Areca Palm (Dypsis lutescens)

Areca Palm (Dypsis lutescens)

Areca palms are a popular indoor plant that is safe for dogs. They have long, feathery fronds that give them a tropical look, and they are excellent at purifying the air.

Areca palms require bright, indirect light and regular watering.

indoor plants which are safe for dogs
Peperomia (Peperomia spp.)

Peperomia (Peperomia spp.)

Peperomia is a group of small, low-growing plants that are safe for dogs. They have thick, succulent leaves that come in a variety of shapes and colors, adding a touch of interest to any room.

Peperomia plants require minimal maintenance and are ideal for pet owners who don’t have a lot of time to care for plants.

First Aid for Plant Poisoning in Dogs

If you suspect that your dog has ingested a toxic plant, time is of the essence.

Here are some steps you should take immediately;

  1. remove any plant material from your dog’s mouth, if possible.

  2. check your dog’s symptoms and note any changes in behaviour.

  3. call your veterinarian or a pet poison control hotline for advice.

  4. if instructed by a professional, induce vomiting with a 3% hydrogen peroxide solution.

  5. bring a sample of the plant (if possible) and any vomit or feces to your veterinarian.

When to seek veterinary care

Even if your dog appears to be feeling better, it is important to seek veterinary care as soon as possible. Some toxic plants can cause delayed reactions or long-term damage to the liver or other organs.

Be sure to inform your veterinarian of any symptoms your dog is experiencing, as well as any known exposure to toxic plants.

Remember, prompt veterinary care can save your dog’s life.

Animal Emergency Phone Numbers by State

Here are the most important emergency numbers to have on hand for pets in each Australian state:

All states:

  • Animal Poisons Helpline: 1300 869 738 (free service)
  • WIRES (wildlife emergencies) Rescue Office: 1300 094 737  for 24/7 emergencies
  • Emergency Snake Catcher Services: 0403 875 409 for 24/7 emergencies

Victoria:

  • RSPCA Victoria: 03 9224 2222

Queensland:

  • RSPCA QLD 24/7 Animal emergencies: 1300 264 625
  • RSPCA QLD Lost and found: 1300 363 736
  • Biosecurity Queensland (for stranded livestock): 13 25 23

New South Wales:

  • RSPCA NSW: 1300 278 358
  • WIRES Wildlife Rescue: 1300 094 737

South Australia:

  • RSPCA South Australia: 1300 477 722
  • Emergency Animal Disease Hotline: 1800 675 888

Western Australia:

  • RSPCA Western Australia: 1300 278 358

Tasmania:

  • RSPCA Tasmania: 03 6244 3033

Northern Territory:

  • RSPCA Darwin Regional Branch: 08 8984 3795

It’s important to have the contact information for your local veterinarian and the nearest 24-hour emergency veterinary clinic.

In case of a serious emergency, you can also call Triple Zero (000) for immediate assistance.

Always keep your regular vet’s number handy, as they should be your first point of contact for most pet health issues.

Download the Free app First Aid for Pets Australia and have all your pets needs at the tip of your palm.

animal medical kit

Want to ensure you are equipped if your dog eats something it shouldn't? Invest in a Pet First Aid KIT that features everything you need to keep your beloved furry friends satisfied and safe (and their humans, too)!

identify safe and Toxic Plants for Dogs

Being aware of safe and toxic plants for dogs is essential for pet owners, especially when travelling in Australia. The harm that toxic plants can cause to dogs can be severe, and early detection of symptoms is crucial. It is important to take preventative measures to avoid plant poisoning, such as identifying safe alternatives to toxic plants.

In the event that your dog ingests a toxic plant, knowing the steps to take for first aid and when to seek veterinary care can make all the difference. By following these guidelines, you can create a safe and healthy environment for your furry friend, both at home and while travelling.

Click to discover 15 indoor plants that are safe for dogs in Australia and create a pet-friendly environment with greenery and peace of mind.

How Pawtal can help you

Pawtal can help you find a wide range of other pet-friendly services. Whether you need pet sitting, grooming, or something else, we can connect you with the best providers in your area. Request a pet service today and let us help you take care of your furry friend.

Want more content like this? Then I recommend joining my pet travel-focused email list here and receive a FREE Pet Travel within Australia guide filled with tips and advice on how to plan your next pet adventure! 

Questions? Join our FREE Facebook group, Pet Travel Adventures. Receive advice about pet care, dog training tips, and anything else to help you to travel with pets.

If you want to stay up-to-date on posts from Pawtal, I recommend joining me on your favourite social media platform (Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest or Twitter).

Recommended Products and Pet Resources

Want help planning a pet adventure or need assistance finding a pet service? Request a pet service and we will reach out to our pet community to find you suitable options that meet your pet’s needs.

Growing up in Australia alongside dogs and cats has equipped me with valuable insights into resources for pet travel. I want to help simplify your experience and recommend some of the tools I use when planning either an afternoon walk or a weekend road trip. 

Not travelling? Have fun at home with Pawtal’s pet product guides and products we love on Pet Hub. I am adding new products which I am loving as my puppy Murphy grows. Or start planning your next adventure with our pet travel guides.

Download your FREE Checklist

Enter your name and email below to have our FREE pet travel checklist sent to your inbox.
Never have to turn back again knowing you have forgotten a pet essential.

Vet Care and pet supplies

Pet Chemist: Your #1 resource for pet products including Parasite Control, Prescription Diets, and health care. Save Up to 50% Compared to Your Vet. Lowest Price Online with an Aussie Support Team. Click here to browse their products now

Vet Supply: My recommended source for cheap Pet Supplies & Food. Genuine Products, Affordable Prices. Brands include Hill’s Prescription Diet, Hill’s Ideal Balance, Hill’s Science Diet, Royal Canin, Pedigree, Black Hawk, Applaws, Optimum, Nutro Natural, SavourLife. Free Fast Delivery on all orders! Click here to shop now

Pet Circle: My go-to source for online pet shopping as they offer low prices on 8000+ Dog, Cat, Bird, Fish, and pet Products. Price Match Guarantee. Subscription options are available and Free Fast Metro Shipping Over $49. Click here to grab a bargain!

Pet Grooming

Pet Cloud Grooming: I recommend Pet Cloud as they understand the importance of pet grooming, and work with only the most experienced and skilled groomers to provide top-quality grooming services to your furry friend. Use code MAKEPAWMEMORIES and get $10.00 off your 1st booking. Find out more by clicking here

Travelling with your pet in Australia? Grab our FREE 32-page guide for essential tips on destinations, accommodations, and more. Plan the perfect pet-friendly adventure now!

Sign up for our monthly newsletter and get your copy sent directly to your email.

Thank you for visiting Pawtal

Your 1st chapter “decoding dog food labels” will be sent to your email.

make paw-memories

Thank you for visiting Pawtal

Your “pet travel checklist” will now be sent to your email.

Never have to turn back as you have forgotten a pet essential item again.

make paw-memories
Pet Travel Within Australia CTA

A 32-page guide filled with tips on destinations, accommodations, and more to plan your next pet adventure!

what’s inside;

  • Preparation Tips
  • Choosing Destinations
  • Accommodation Insights
  • Travel Modes
  • Exploring Together
  • Managing Challenges